Tag Archives: surveillance

DVR Maintenance Tips

As a service to you, we are supplying you with some helpful tips to keep your video security system up, DVR and cameras, and running well. A little prevention or self help can save you money and keep your system healthy. Continue reading

Is Your Mobile Phone Bugging You? (Seriously.)

Is your mobile phone acting “funny,” or not as fast as it once was? Have you noticed that someone seems to know more about what’s going on in your life than they should? Do people say that they tried to call you, but your phone was busy (and you weren’t using it)? Does your battery seem to be sucking more juice than usual?

You can mark it down to coincidence, or it may mean that your phone has either been infected with a virus, or there’s a program running on the OS that is “listening” to, and/or, recording your email, text messages, logging your calls, and conversations. Both are different in use and theory, but in both cases they’re a security threat and nuisance. Continue reading

Words from the Boss: Cloned Debit Cards Add to ATM Thefts

Technology makes our lives easier, or at least it’s supposed to; yet, as our understanding  improves and complicated processes, such as computer programming, become more user-friendly,  some decide to use these innovations to prey upon others.

ATM skimming-devices, for instance, have evolved from clunky, obvious pieces of fake auto-bank teller equipment to sleek, undetectable theft devices that are unnoticeable to untrained eyes. As the equipment becomes better, the criminals grow in sophistication, often stealing hundreds of thousands in others’ money before being discovered. Continue reading

Chicago’s Highway Surveillance System

The Chicago Police Department, and retiring Mayor Daley, want to take Chicago’s surveillance system to the highway. The ambitious plan, announced earlier this year, is to install some 200 cameras along interstate highways between Chicago and Mexico. The camera’s function is to take pictures of license plates and cross-reference them to known images of smuggler, drug traffickers, and gun runners. Continue reading

Copyright Office Unleashes iPhone; Legalizes Jailbreaking

The U.S. Copyright Office announced that jailbreaking (software modifications that liberate iPhones and other handsets to run applications from sources other than those approved by the phone maker) the iPhone, and basically any Apple O/S, is legal. The decision stems from a request by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the new ruling rewrites the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Continue reading

U.S. & Russian Spy Rings Mimic Hollywood

If you’ve been reading or watching the news lately, you undoubtedly know that the United States and Russia are in the midst of a so-called spy swap.  On June 27, the FBI arrested 10 people on charges that they were deep-cover spies working for the Russian government but living for years in the United States. Their job, according to the DOJ, was to determine U.S. “secrets by making connections to think tanks and government officials.” Continue reading

Don’t Forget to Secure the Garage!

Securing a home is something with which most of us are familiar, even if we don’t own one. Security bars, electronic locks, home security systems, video cameras, and motion-sensor lighting are all tools that help deter crime. Too often, however, the focus is on the home’s living areas, leave a “weak link” in home security that’s easy to exploit. Continue reading

Covert Video Recorders

HELP! I Need to Record this Event on Video and all I Have is My Keychain!
Have you ever run into a situation where you needed to take a picture, or record an event on video, but didn’t have your camera with you?
Whether it is a Confrontation with a Neighbor, a Run In with the Police, a Sexual Harassment Situation, or just Good Times with Friends, there are many situations where a video camera can make all the difference.

U Spy Enterprises www.USpyStore.com is proud to bring you the Key Chain Camera. Continue reading

How Does a DVR Work?

The DVR automatically records on motion. The problem is, with the trees blowing, cars moving etc, there is plenty of motion happening. We can screen out the unwanted motion so it does not activate the recording. The DVR will still record the entire view of the camera but the areas that are screened will not activate the camera to record. I hope that makes sense.

It stores up the video recording onto a hard drive of various sizes, depending on what you buy and the capacity of the DVR. Once your DVR reaches the storage capacity it begins recording over the oldest data. So there will be a rolling block of time that moves along. It’s hard to calculate what that total time is until the hard drive gets filled. But you can experiment by checking the DVR to see how far back you can go in time. Then you will have an idea of the amount of time you are getting before the video starts to disappear. We can increase the hard drive up to the capacity of the DVR. Some DVRs can take 2, 3 or more hard drives. But the size if each drive may be limited by the DVR specifications so you must check whatever that limit is. We have some standalone DVRs that are limited to 1 Terabyte (1000 GB) per drive.

To make a backup of an event, follow the various directions for backing up with a USB flash drive, CD-ROM, or DVD or by the Network as specified for your particular DVR. Events are usually short time periods, easily less than 30 minutes at a time. Usually 1-5 minutes. You don’t save the entire hard drive since you will be watching 99% of boring daily life around you and nothing of value. Plus the cost of hard drives will add up. If there is an incident that you wish to archive or save, you go to that date and follow the directions provided for your DVR. Then take that backup which will be on a flash drive, DVD or CD-ROM or to a computer and save it in a safe place or give it to the police or insurance company. Or play it on any computer (usually Windows) as the backup will usually contain a small player that can play the video file on any PC. Some DVRs record directly in an AVI format that can be played with a common media player such as Windows Media Player, QuickTime, Real Player or other video player If the file is recorded in that special format, you can convert the file to AVI from the player to give to police, Once it is in the AVI format, any PC or Macintosh computer will be able to play it.

I hope this makes sense. Each DVR is unique but the above is the case for most. Some cheap DVRs don’t offer the backup methods of above and require you to play the video you want to save directly to another recording source such as a DVD recorder or VCR. And remember, even the Macintosh compatible DVRs we sell will not be able to play the proprietary format of the DVR recording. You will need to convert the file to AVI with a Windows PC before viewing the backup on a Apple or Mac machine. Call or email me any questions so I can clarify. Good luck and stay secure.

Setting Up Remote Access

So you were enticed to buy a DVR because you see that it remote accessible. Great! Just plug that puppy into a router and a way we go. Right? Not so fast.

The DVR side is fairly simple. Just change or make sure your setting is DHCP (automatic assigning of an internal IP address) and check whatever the IP address was signed. That’s the easy part. At least now you can use the IP address assigned to use for IN-Network access. This means you will be able to see your cameras by using the appropriate browser or software to log into your cameras. But wait! You want to see your home from work or see your work from home. Or see your cameras from anywhere in the world.

Now comes the hard part. Your router now needs to be configured to allow the traffic requests from the outside. You will need to port forward whatever ports your DVR designates. Each DVR is different and most are changeable. The reason they are changeable is that there may be conflicts on your network so when port 80 does not work, you can change the setup to use port 80.

Inside your router, depending on which router, you will need to setup the router to ROUTE traffic for this port to the DVR i.e. the internal IP address that was assigned.

If you have no idea what I mean, you best hire us or an IT professional to handle the rest. But in case you are adventurous or just want to learn how to do this, here are a couple of free tips DVR network setup for you.

Make sure that your Internet provider is not blocking ports. This means that they may be blocking anything you do so no matter what you do, your camera or DVR signal will not make it through your provider’s firewall. Test this by visiting http://www.canyouseeme.org. Test various ports to see if traffic is allowed. If it is great. If not, you may need to call your provider to ask them to allow access to specific ports. Or you may need to buy what is called a Static IP address.

If you have setup the router and configured the remote access successfully, you may still have a lot of work ahead. If you are using Internet Explorer, you may need to add certain add ons to make your browser work. These add ons are mini programs or active X modules that will make the video visible to you. And your browser settings may be set too high to allow this. So you may need to go to Tools – Internet Options – Security Settings – Custom Level. Here you will need to either set everything to either Allow or Prompt (if allow is not secure) and apply the changes. This change now allows your browser to install what it needs to see the video.

If you prefer to use the DVR software, then do that as there are no security issues with that part. That software is usually headache free but it too may need certain settings such as antivirus anti spyware or other settings adjusted to make it work.

U-Spy offers this service to all customers and installers with special discounts. We also offer a Dynamic IP forwarding service for $24/year that will allow you to keep the cheaper Dynamic Internet service instead of the much costlier Static IP setup.

Call 888-338-1881 with questions. We know you will have plenty.