Tag Archives: illegal

Hotels Top Identity Theft List

Identity theft is the new watchword; hackers, thieves and criminals are continually discovering new methods to twist technology in an effort to steal personal information. Social media networks, cell phones, discarded utility bills and outright theft of personal property are all means employed by thieves to hijack your personal information.

Trustwave, a security and compliance company, provides security information services and end-to-end solutions for businesses in an effort to protect confidential information systems. A recent report shows that hotels are now the top source for credit card data theft, surpassing restaurants for the top spot; nearly 40% of all personal data in 2009 came from hotels/motels compared to just 13% of thefts from restaurants.

Hackers target hotel/motel booking and reservation centers due to the high-number of credit card numbers these entities keep “on-file.” Like the Internet, once a credit card is in the system, it’s available. A successful hacker can steal thousands of credit card numbers and, in essence, thousands–or millions–of dollars. Credit card numbers are used for numerous hotel services, such as bars, beaches, golf courses, swimming pools, gift shops, spas, and other recreational areas; however, they’re all processed through one main database.

Since hotels use proprietary systems, they’re easy for hackers to exploit: a computer system at one hotel is similar, if not exactly the same, as the computer system at a competing hotel.

The other unavoidable fact of hotels and motels are the number of employees who have access to the computer system and your personal data. According to an ABC News Report; “You have so many different employees going through the system that it allows them to either skim cards or put in malware that lets the bad guys hack into the system.”

In June 2010, Destination Hotels & Resorts had its computer system hacked and the credit card data of more than 700 guests from across the country was stolen; in January, Wyndham reported that their computer systems were breached and hackers accessed information from 31 hotels between November 2009 and January 2o1o. They never reported how many cards were compromised.

Credit card companies usually don’t require consumers to pay for unauthorized charges, but credit card users must report the theft in a timely manner to ensure their identity remains safe; the best method to is to check statements regularly and keep tabs on credit reports.

The Toothbrush Cam? A Joke, or Something a Bit Sinister?

Security and surveillance cameras come in all shapes and sizes; as technology has increased, the size of our electronics has decreased. Hidden cameras, also known as Spy cams or, in some cases, Nanny Cams, are sold one of two ways; the first is as a ready to use product. In other words, let’s say that the needed to be placed in a home to monitor the activities of older teenagers after school. To keep the camera “a secret,” a customer would simply purchase an item like a wall clock with the camera already installed. The second method is to buy a camera and install it where needed. This is a method that could be used in almost any situation as long as the installer had some experience on the most effective location to perform the install.

Today, hidden cameras are available in items like wrist watches, ballpoint pens, MP3 docking stations, clock radios, wall radios, jump drives, and other common items. As cameras grow steadily smaller, so do the items in which they can be installed; which, depending on the camera’s use, is a positive. Yet, as with all technology, there will be those that use advances in technology for immoral, and criminal, activities.

It’s safe to assume that no one wants to be filmed using the bathroom, so the technicians and managers at USpy Store aren’t quite sure what to make of a toothbrush camera. If it’s not being used to make sure that your 7-year old brushes his teeth, it’s suspected that this camera will be utilized for recording sexual exploits without raising suspicion. USpy Store’s staff of security and surveillance experts felt it was our duty to pass this on to ensure that our customers and friends were aware of this camera.

Per the distributor (we will not condone their product by adding a lindo anyone justice by mentioning them) it is packaged in an Packaged in a Braun Oral B toothbrush casing, both the camera and DVR are huosed in that single case. Creatively named the ” Pinhole Spy Toothbrush,” the device is capable of 4-to-5 hours of continuous use, provides 640×480 video in AVI, and carried  8GB of flash memory. It is packaged in an ORAL B toothbrush casing and costs $243.

U-Spy is here to serve you: If you think that you’re being monitored without your knowledge USpy can provide recommendations and advice on counter-surveillance equipment, like bug and camera detectors. If you need advice on how these items operate, please either check our website; www.uspystore.com, send an email; info@uspystore.com or give us a call at 773-529-2SPY (2779). We are open from 9am to 7 pm, Monday through Saturday, CST.