Category Archives: Electronic Countermeasures

“With new technology, you can watch everyone in your home, from the nanny to the pet sitter. But should you?”

” You have two choices: You can bury your head in the sand and hope for the best, or be proactive and get yourself some eyes on the scene. ” – Perry Myers, President of the U-Spy.

A thought provoking piece written by Jennifer Graham from deseret news discussing personal surveillance in your home. Perry Myers, president of U-Spy, was asked to speak on the topic as well! Give it a read, you don’t want to miss out!

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900060170/with-new-technology-you-can-watch-everyone-in-your-home-from-the-nanny-to-the-pet-sitter-but-should-you-alarm-clock-a-necktie-sunglasses-emoji-security-spy-recordings.html

 

 

What Counter Surveillance device should I choose??

There are many types of Counter Surveillance devices on the market and it might be difficult to choose which unit will work for you. Please see the video below explaining the different types of Counter Surveillance devices and what they are used for. Hopefully this will help you choose what device or devices will work for your specific situation!

For more videos please visit our YouTube channel.

How to tell if you are being bugged

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There are a lot of different recording devices available for consumer purchase these days. Hidden Surveillance cameras can range in looks from your everyday household objects like a clock radios all the way to objects that are not so covert.

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Is Your Mobile Phone Bugging You? (Seriously.)

Is your mobile phone acting “funny,” or not as fast as it once was? Have you noticed that someone seems to know more about what’s going on in your life than they should? Do people say that they tried to call you, but your phone was busy (and you weren’t using it)? Does your battery seem to be sucking more juice than usual?

You can mark it down to coincidence, or it may mean that your phone has either been infected with a virus, or there’s a program running on the OS that is “listening” to, and/or, recording your email, text messages, logging your calls, and conversations. Both are different in use and theory, but in both cases they’re a security threat and nuisance. Continue reading

Radio Frequency Identification

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the use of an object (called an RFID tag) applied to or incorporated into a product, animal, or person for the purpose of identification and tracking using radio fequencies.

RFID is utilized for open-road tolling, making payments using mobile phones,

The US government utilizes RFID for traffic management, and companies use the technology to keep track of expensive equipment, essentially initiating a surveillance program for inventory.  RFID’s future is currently not known due to privacy regulations that may keep many of the applications from moving forward.

A Westport, CT company–SecureRF–is currently examining applications to use RFID chips to keep track of children via student ID cards using radio frequencies much similar to GPS (although very different technologies).

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GPS Application Leads Police to Thieves

A recent rash of New Hampshire thefts caused police to investigate and warn the public not to leave valuable items inside vehicles parked in the state’s national park areas–especially at trail heads. U.S. Forest Service agents also cautioned visitors to lock their cars.

A recent investigation was launched after thieves smashed car windows to get into vehicles, stealing electronics and cash.

Unfortunately for the unwitting criminals, police were able to track down them down within hours due to quick action stemming from a victim’s GPS application on his cell phone. Most of these smash-and-grab type cases go unsolved, especially due to the remote locations, time delay between the crime and report, and absence of witnesses to the crime.

In this case, the victim went to the State Trooper barracks and borrowed a police computer to track the location of his Smartphone; the phone was in a nearby community, and appeared to be with someone walking.

State Law Enforcement officers called the community’s police department, who dispatched officer to the area; the officer spotted a group of juveniles outside the residential area. A local Forest Service special agent also assisted, helping police determine four teens as the likely suspects. Police recovered the majority of property and the teens eventually confessed they’d participated in the crime spree, or were guilty of receiving stolen goods.

While the case remains under investigation, police expect charges to be filed shortly. Ah, technology!

Copyright Office Unleashes iPhone; Legalizes Jailbreaking

The U.S. Copyright Office announced that jailbreaking (software modifications that liberate iPhones and other handsets to run applications from sources other than those approved by the phone maker) the iPhone, and basically any Apple O/S, is legal. The decision stems from a request by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the new ruling rewrites the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Continue reading

U.S. & Russian Spy Rings Mimic Hollywood

If you’ve been reading or watching the news lately, you undoubtedly know that the United States and Russia are in the midst of a so-called spy swap.  On June 27, the FBI arrested 10 people on charges that they were deep-cover spies working for the Russian government but living for years in the United States. Their job, according to the DOJ, was to determine U.S. “secrets by making connections to think tanks and government officials.” Continue reading

Don’t Forget to Secure the Garage!

Securing a home is something with which most of us are familiar, even if we don’t own one. Security bars, electronic locks, home security systems, video cameras, and motion-sensor lighting are all tools that help deter crime. Too often, however, the focus is on the home’s living areas, leave a “weak link” in home security that’s easy to exploit. Continue reading

Bugnets: More Than Backyard Pests

Meetings with friends or clients. Private phone conversations. New business presentations. Financial transactions. Personal/family interactions. All items that we, as citizens of the United States, assume are private interactions, protected, and respected, by others. Continue reading